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Cultural Ranger & Archaeology Field School, southwest USA

May 26, 2019

 September 4th - 30th, 2019

 

Applied Archaeology International, in partnership with Southern Ute Education, Hopi Cultural Preservation, Alpine Archaeological Consultants and the Colorado Department of Transportation, is pleased to announce a month-long, intensive field school in archaeology, heritage preservation, and cultural heritage management.       

 

This program will involve three core projects:

 

1) Session 1 involves archaeological field methods training as part of an integrated Cultural Resource Management (CRM) investigation of a cultural site complex, south of Durango, Colorado. 

 

2) Session 2 will work under the direction of Hopi Elders and Cultural Preservation officers to carry out a cultural health assessment and on-ground actions to restore a sacred freshwater spring in Hopi.

 

3) Session 3 will focus on a site stabilization project of a cultural place complex in Hopi, involving the use of site survey, assessment and GPR mapping to develop a site plan, and then on-ground actions, under cultural leadership, to protect the ancestral Hopi Pueblo site. 

 

The field school is culturally-guided, project-focused, action driven. We will visit some of the most iconic archaeological and cultural places of the Four Corners, including Canyons of the Ancients, Mesa Verde and Chaco Canyon.  

 

In addition to core archaeological survey, mapping and excavation skills, this field school program takes the team through what it means to be a cultural heritage ranger in the Four Corners, and is based on an international model; which involves:

 

·         Learning, understanding and following cultural protocols

·         Place-name mapping and cultural surveys

·         Anthropological surveys

·         Archaeological surveys, mapping, and excavation field skills

·         Archaeological curation methods

·         GIS, data management, and mapping

·         Photography, 3D models, and drone operations

·         Community and applied archaeology

·         Cultural plant surveys and traditional subsistence

·         Ceramic artifact identification workshops

·         Spiritual ecology

·         Flint-knapping workshop, making a bow, and stone artifact analysis

·         On-ground heritage protection and management projects

 

Applied Archaeology is available to assist in developing your experience and organize and plan the program to meet your specific interests.  We can also assist to arrange high school or college credit for your participation.

 

How it Works

 

In addition to the engagement of Elders and project partners, Applied Archaeology has a small coordination team of community archaeologists and heritage preservationists. This includes:

 

  • Muz Pinnecoose, Ute Elder, craftsman, mentor

  • David Guilfoyle, Australian-US archaeologist (see info below)

  • Genevieve Carey, University of Montana

  • Robert Bearheart, archaeologist, Ojibwa Tribal member, Salish-Kootenai College

  • Georgiana Pongyesva, Hopi Cultural Preservation

  • Micah Odoms, Anthropology Graduate, Fort Lewis College

  • Cameron Weaver, Southern Ute/Navajo Tribal member, Archaeological Field Tech

  • Zac 'Waalitj' Webb, Chairperson, Undalup Association (Wadandi, SW Australia)

 

This coordination team will work with a team of field school participants as one crew, and carry out a range of activities with support from the Alpine Archaeological Consultants crews.  The team will participate in orientation and training sessions on each of the themes listed above and then participate in practical field projects that apply these themes to real-world, on-ground projects. The program will be flexible to focus on individual interests and will strive to integrate with local cultural protocols and requirements; at all times.

 

 Session 1: The US 550 Project?

 

The Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) proposes to realign the interchange between U.S. Highway 550 and its present intersection with U.S. Highway 160, south of Durango in La Plata County, Colorado.